Nigerian internet dating scammers

The man Rhonda Meade fell in love with promised to elope with her to a tropical island paradise where they could be married along white beaches as the setting sun shimmered across vast, crystal-clear waters.But, the only thing that ran away from the 36-year-old single mother’s life of hardship would eventually be all her savings and the security she had entrusted with “Walter.”Meade, whose name has been changed to protect her identity, was one of millions of people who flock to the Internet each year in search of romance and a long term relationship.

Nigerian internet dating scammers Forums single dating in jakarta

Messenger from October 2006 through February 2007, Walter, a self-described white collar engineer and college sports enthusiast, ended up taking the spellbound Meade for the ride of her life.“We were going to get married,” she recalls, fighting back tears.

“But, then, he told me he had lost his job, was laid off, and that he was in need.

So, I did what I would have done for any man I was invested in like that.

I gave him the money.”After transferring $7,000 to Walter’s bank account from her own savings account, Meade says her chats with the man became less frequent, and finally, stopped altogether.“I was taken for a fool,” Meade said, “and I was heartbroken.”The Nigerian Scam Moves to Messaging But, while Walter had fallen on hard times, a Nigerian man thousands of miles away was making a killing as part of an operation of scammers who target men and women into romantic relationships only to leave them high and dry.“You never think you can become a victim until it happens to you,” Meade said.

“But, with as many people as there are online, the Internet is ripe with people these scam men can sucker into their scheme.”Each year, thousands of men and women use the online chat forums and messaging apps to meet potential dates and perhaps, potential spouses.

But, while the person on the other end of your messaging app might seem legitimate, how can you tell?One of the longest running scams by mail and the Internet, the Nigerian '419' scam (named after the section of the Nigerian code dealing with financial fraud schemes), alleges a wealthy business owner or government official needs help transferring millions of dollars out of his country in exchange for a percentage of the funds for your help.After agreeing to help, the scammer often asks for your assistance in providing some money to help get the money transferred, according to David Emery, About.com’s Guide to Urban Legends.Today, the scam has moved to messaging and social media, where the new operation involves fake photos and false identities.It's estimated that the scam, which has been around for at least 20 years, costs victims a hundred million dollars annually.Meade was one of those victims.“After reporting the incident to both federal and local law enforcement, I was told I probably shouldn’t expect to see the money ever again,” she said.

Comments are closed.