Too old for dating

he generally accepted age for the Earth and the rest of the solar system is about 4.55 billion years (plus or minus about 1%).

This value is derived from several different lines of evidence.

too old for dating-42

Too old for dating

Further, the processes of erosion and crustal recycling have apparently destroyed all of the earliest surface.

The oldest rocks which have been found so far (on the Earth) date to about 3.8 to 3.9 billion years ago (by several radiometric dating methods).

Some of these rocks are sedimentary, and include minerals which are themselves as old as 4.1 to 4.2 billion years.

Rocks of this age are relatively rare, however rocks that are at least 3.5 billion years in age have been found on North America, Greenland, Australia, Africa, and Asia.

While these values do not compute an age for the Earth, they do establish a lower limit (the Earth must be at least as old as any formation on it).

This lower limit is at least concordant with the independently derived figure of 4.55 billion years for the Earth's actual age.

The most direct means for calculating the Earth's age is a Pb/Pb isochron age, derived from samples of the Earth and meteorites.

This involves measurement of three isotopes of lead (Pb-206, Pb-207, and either Pb-208 or Pb-204).

A plot is constructed of Pb-206/Pb-204 versus Pb-207/Pb-204.

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